New York City Course Info


 

Registration 

 

What Makes a Great City                                              

Alexander Garvin-  Professor of Architecture at Yale

Mondays, March 5 - April 9, 3:00- 5:00 pm                       $450

Location: Yale Club of New York City, 50 Vanderbilt Ave, New York, NY 10017

 

Course Description: 

What Makes a Great City deals with great cities (not a good cities or functional cities but a great cities) that contain places that people admire, learn from, and replicate. Class discussions will examine the public realm of great cities in terms of their history, demographic composition, politics, economy, topography, layout, architecture, and planning. In particular, they will focus on the interplay between people and public realm. The emphasis will be on 19th and 20th century New York City, Paris, and London, as well as specific twenty-first century initiatives in Houston, Atlanta, Brooklyn, and Toronto.

 

Course Material:

REQUIRED READING:

    A. Garvin: WHAT MAKES A GREAT CITY, 2016, Island Press

RECOMMENDED READING:               

    A. Garvin: THE PLANNING GAME, 2013, W. W. Norton & Company,

Edmund Bacon:  DESIGN OF CITIES, NY, Penguin Books, 1976

Hillary Ballon (ed.): THE GREATEST GRID: Master Plan of Manhattan 1811-2011, Museum of the City of NY, 2012

Frederick Law Olmsted (in FREDERICK LAW OLMSFTED ESSENTIALTEXTS, edited by Robert Twombly, WW Norton, NY, 2010

Gehl, Gemzoe, Kirknaes, & Sondergaard: NEW CITY LIFE, Copenhagen, Danish Architectural Press, 2006

Charles H. Bohl: PLACE MAKING, ULI-Urban Land Institute, Washington DC, 2002

 *Please have the required reading done prior to the session it is assigned for to fully participate in the class discussions.

 

Course Dates:            Click Here for Syllabus

Week 1- Mar 5:    Introduction- The importance & characteristics of the public realm

Week 2- Mar 12:   Attracting & retaining users of the public realm

Week 3- Mar 19:   Public realm frameworks that shape urbanization

Week 4- Mar 26:   A habitable environment & a civil society

Week 5- Apr 2:     Using the public realm to shape daily life

Week 6- Apr 9:     The 21st public realm

 

Registration

Professor Alexander Garvin

Alexander Garvin has combined a career in urban planning and real estate with teaching, architecture, and public service. He is responsible for initial master plans for the Atlanta BeltLine, Tessera (a 700-acre new community outside Austin), and Hinton Park in Collierville, Tennessee. Between 1996 and 2005 he was managing director for planning at NYC2012, the committee established to bring the Summer Olympics to New York in 2012. During 2002-2003, as Vice President for Planning, Design and Development, he was responsible for planning the rebuilding of the World Trade Center for the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation. Over the last 46 years he has held prominent positions in five New York City administrations, including Deputy Commissioner of Housing and City Planning Commissioner.

For the past 50 years Garvin has taught at Yale University, his alma mater, where, as Adjunct Professor of Urban Planning and Management, he has taught a wide range of courses in architecture, city planning, and real estate development.

Garvin is the author of The American City: What Works and What Doesn’t, now in its third edition; The Planning Game; Parks, Recreation and Open Space: A 21st Century Agenda; Public Parks: The Key to Livable Communities; What Makes a Great City; and numerous articles.


Virginia Woolf's - Mrs. Dalloway and To the lighthouse       

Registration

Priscilla Gilman '93 BA '02 PhD  

Mondays, March 5 - April 9, 6:00- 7:30 pm                           $395

Location: Yale Club of New York City, 50 Vanderbilt Ave, New York, NY 10017

 

Course Description: 

Together, we'll read two of the greatest novels in the English language.  We'll spend three classes on each novel.

 

Course Material:

Mrs. Dalloway, Virginia Woolf

To The Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf

* Kindle versions are not recommended  

 

Course Dates:            Syllabus TBD:

Week 1- Mar 5:  Mrs. Dalloway

Week 2- Mar 12:

Week 3- Mar 19:

Week 4- Mar 26:  To the Lighthouse

Week 5- Apr 2:

Week 6- Apr 9:


 

Poetry and Stillness                                                             

Registration

Priscilla Gilman '93 BA '02 PhD  

Mondays, March 5 - April 9, 7:45 - 9:15 pm                    $395

Location: Yale Club of New York City, 50 Vanderbilt Ave, New York, NY 10017

 

Course Description: 

In ​William Wordsworth's famous formulation, poetry "takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquillity."  In this class, we'll consider the relationship between poetry and ​stillness and all its associated qualities: quiet, peace, slowness.  ​

How ​are​ the writing and the reading of poetry meditative acts​?  How ​are ​slowing down, arresting attention, making form out of chaos central to the poet's task?  ​How can reading poems help us slow down, attain stillness, achieve tranquillity?  We'll read both poets' statements and musings on the nature of poetry, poems about slowness or slowing down, and poems that are especially conducive to stillness.  Poets studied will include Wordsworth, Keats, Blake, Shakespeare, Mary Oliver, Bishop, Dickinson, Roethke, Frost, Yeats, Mark Strand, John Ashbery, W.S. Merwin, Audre Lord, Auden, Eliot, Naomi Shihab Nye, Matthew Arnold, Dylan Thomas, Lucille Clifton, William Cowper, Whitman, and Milton.

 

Course Material:

TBD

 

Course Dates:            Syllabus TBD:

Week 1- Mar 5:

Week 2- Mar 12:

Week 3- Mar 19:

Week 4- Mar 26:

Week 5- Apr 2:

Week 6- Apr 9:

 

Registration

Professor Priscilla Gilman

Priscilla Gilman is a former assistant professor of English at Yale and Vassar and the author ofThe Anti-Romantic Child: A Story of Unexpected Joy (Harper), a memoir filled with the romantic poetry she specialized in as an academic.  Priscilla grew up in New York City and graduated from The Brearley School and Yale summa cum laude with exceptional distinction in the English major. She went on to earn her masters and Ph.D. in English and American literature at Yale, and spent two years as an assistant professor of English at Yale and four years as an assistant professor of English at Vassar College before leaving academia in 2006.  The Anti-Romantic Child, Gilman’s first book, was excerpted in Newsweek magazine and featured on the cover of its international edition. It was an NPR Morning Edition Must-Read, Slate‘s Book of the Week, selected as one the Best Books of 2011 by the Leonard Lopate Show, and chosen as a Best Book of 2011 by The Chicago TribuneThe Anti-Romantic Child was one of five nominees for a Books for a Better Life Award for Best First Book and was awarded the Mom’s Choice Gold Award, rewarding the best in family-friendly media and literature.  Gilman writes about literature, parenting, autism, and education and reviews fiction and literary non-fiction for the Daily Beast,The New York Times Book ReviewThe New York Times’ MotherlodeThe Chicago TribuneMOREO: The Oprah MagazineReal SimpleRedbook, the Boston Globe, andHuff Post Parents.  Gilman has been the parenting/education advice columnist for #1 best-selling author Susan Cain's Quiet Revolution website and a Scholar/Facilitator for the New York Council for the Humanities.   A prize-winning teacher and with a background in the performing arts, Gilman leads book groups and private writing workshops in New York City and speaks frequently at schools, conferences, and organizations about parenting, education, and the arts.  She is now at work on her second book, The Critic's Daughter, which will be published by W.W. Norton. 

 


 

Free Speech and its Discontents                                            

Registration

Justin Zaremby  

Wednesdays, March 7 - April 11, 7:00- 8:30 pm                    $395

Location: Jay Suites 3rd Fl Conference Room, 369 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10017

 

Course Description:

What is freedom of speech and why does it matter? Although the idea of free speech is generally considered a hallmark of American liberal democracy, the limits of that freedom are a perennial source of controversy.  In recent years, the debate over the importance of free speech has taken on a new urgency in public spaces (both physical and online) and universities.  This course will examine the idea of free speech from numerous angles, with subjects including the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, academic freedom at colleges and universities, and the potential of speech to cause harm.  Readings will include John Milton's Areopagitica, John Stuart Mill's On Liberty, Catherine MacKinnon's Only Words, numerous legal decisions, and Yale's Report of the Committee on Freedom of Expression at Yale (the "Woodward Report").

 

Course Material:

TBD

 

 

Course Dates:            Syllabus:

Week 1- March 7:         John Milton’s Areopagitica

Week 2- March 14:       John Stuart Mill’s On Liberty

Week 3- March 21:       Introduction to First Amendment Jurisprudence

Week 4- March 28:       Academic Freedom in the United States

Week 5- April 4:           Catharine MacKinnon’s Only Words

Week 6- April 11:         Free Speech on Campus

 

Registration

Professor Justin Zaremby 

 

Justin Zaremby is a New York lawyer who specializes in the representation of non-profit organizations such as private foundations, universities, museums, and other tax-exempt entities on a variety of matters including corporate governance and restructuring, charitable giving, program-related investing, and international grantmaking.  He received his B.A., Ph.D. and J.D. from Yale, where he won the Prize Teaching Fellowship for distinguished undergraduate teaching.  He is the author of Legal Realism and American Law (2014), Directed Studies and the Evolution of American General Education (2006), and has published articles and book reviews in numerous publications including The New Criterion, the Yale Journal of Law and the Humanities and the Rutgers Law Review

 

 


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